Tag Archives: Love as Action

A Mother’s Love….

I am reposting this for Mother’s Day from last year and will do so each year.  Hope you enjoy reading it as a reminder.

There is a common answer given by most people who have performed an heroic, life-threatening deed in order to save another human being.   In response to the inevitable question by a TV report asking “What did you feel when you were doing that?” the answer is usually “I really felt nothing.”

For example, a stranger who helped pull three children from a burning car answered the question about how he felt with the words:   “I didn’t even think about it.  It was happening so fast, and I knew I just had to get them out of there.”   Another example is the mother who lifted a tree that had pinned her son’s leg:   “I didn’t even feel how heavy it was—-until I put it down.”

You see, when love, care, and compassion for another take over completely, it is expressed in actions, not feelings.   Love is action!  Genuine love always leaps before it looks!    

That is exactly the love we celebrate on Mother’s Day this coming weekend—love in action.   Love is the force behind all the meals Mom prepares and prepared for us;  love is behind the chauffered trips to soccer, baseball, ballet, piano lesson, etc.   Love is behind all of those good-night books read to sleepy children by a tired mom at the end of a long day; love is behind all the walks and talks—-and all the other things that Mom’s do today and did in the past.    Our mothers may have not told us they loved us very often, but we knew from their actions as we look back on them how much they did love and care for us and still do if we are blessed enough to still have them with us.

So—on Mother’s Day try to do something that shows how much you love and appreciate your mother.   Don’t just tell her we love her, but DO SOMETHING TO SHOW YOUR LOVE.!

Shortly before Jesus’ death he gave his disciples a new commandment  (See John 13:31-35)     He told them to “show your love”.   He said “Love one another as I have loved you.”   He said, “By your love for each other they will know you are my disciples.”   And the love Jesus recommended was action oriented.   Jesus showed people his care for them by healing, teaching, and showing them his compassion—not just talking about it!  

How do we measure up to this commandment of love—-by our actions—not our words.   

Let me give you an example from my own life.   One Christmas, not too long after our daughter Lisa was married, my wife (now deceased) and I received a frame letter from her.   It says, in part…

“THANK YOU….

for staying together.   there are so few children today who have two parents.   Through your commitment to each other in good times and bad times you have taught me that love does not give up and it does not leave.   I saw modeled in you that love is a choice, not always a feeling.

thank you for lots of hugs and love.   You taught me that showing affection is a good thing and that I should never be embarrassed to say “I love you”.   Your affection shown to one another assured me that all was well in the world…

Thank you, Mom and Dad, for patiently persevering and loving me unconditionally even when I was the most stubborn and difficult to be around.   The love, sacrifice, and commitment you have shown me has not gone unnoticed.

You have laid a foundation in my life of security, confidence and love that has enabled me to love and be loved.   I am seeing the value of this foundation in my marriage and also in my most important relationship with God….”

This framed letter is one of my most important possessions.  It shows how love for each other influences those around us, including our children.

ARE WE DOING THIS?   Not always!   As this story indicates:

The story is told about a Los Angeles police officer who pulled a driver over to the side of the freeway and asked for his license and registration.

“What’s wrong officer?” the driver asked, “I didn’t go through any red lights, and I certainly wasn’t speeding.”

“No you weren’t speeding or breaking any laws, the officer said:   “but I saw you flashing the one-fingered salute as you swerved around the lady who was driving too slow in the center lane, and I further observed your flushed and angry face as you shouted unprintable things at the driver of the Hummer who cut you off, and I saw how you pounded your steering wheel when the freeway traffic ground to a halt.”

“Is that a crime, officer?”

“No, but when I saw the “JESUS LOVES YOU AND SO DO I” bumper sticker on your car, I figured, “This car has go to be stolen!”

LOVE IS LESS WHAT YOU SAY AND FEEL THAN IT IS WHAT YOU DO!   Amen.

 

 

 

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Loving our Neighbors

Jesus told his followers to “Love the Lord your God with all your heart, soul, mind and strength; and your neighbor as yourself.”    What did he mean?   How do you go about loving your neighbor?    Who is your neighbor anyway?

How many of us, as parents,  have watched our child get hurt on the playground?     We see it happen, and we feel in our own bodies the hurt that our child is experiencing, don’t we?   If one we love is hurting, we feel their hurt in our body and we rush to help them.  I think that is what Jesus was talking about when he said:   “Love your neighbor as yourself.”    I’d like to share with you several keys that enable us to truly love our neighbors as we love ourselves:

  • The first, and most important key is to experience God’s love ourselves.    If we have not experienced God’s love for us and come to  trust in God’s love and care for us it is difficult for us to love anyone else—including ourselves and your neighbor.  We are like children who have never experienced love who find it difficult or impossible to love anyone else, including themselves.
  • The second key is to be able to see God in the face of our neighbor.  All of us are God’s children and are created in God’s image.   Our neighbor is a child of God.    That neighbor may look much different than  us.   They may be mean and nasty.   They may  be immoral.   They may be dirty and unkempt.   They may  be frightening in their looks.   But they are a child of God nonetheless.    Jesus told a parable about neighbors in answer to someone’s question—“Who is my neighbor?”    It is the parable of the Good Samaritan.   In the story,  the one who turns out to be the good neighbor is a Samaritan who was despised by the Jews.   Likewise Samaritans were  known to despise Jews.   Yet the Samaritan is the one who saw a dying man on the side of the road and stopped to help him when the members of the Jewish religious community passed by on the other side.   The Samaritan  did not see a despised Jewish man on the side of the road, but saw a child of God.   He saw the face of God in that Jewish man who was near death and came to his aid.
  • The third key is action.   It is not enough to see your neighbor’s face and to see them as a child of God—you must act, if you are to show love to your neighbor.     Love is not just a feeling—-it is much more.  Love is expressed in action.    Love is binding up the wounds of the bleeding man.  For us,  love of neighbor  is putting your arms around the homeless man who is dirty and despairing and giving them a hug.   Love is feeding the hungry.  Love is clothing those who are needy.   Love is getting medical care for the one who is sick.  Love is treating fellow children of God as we would like to be treated if we were in their situation. Love is an action word!

Are we following this Great Commandment of Jesus and loving our neighbor as ourselves?    Are we?

A Mother’s Love….

There is a common answer given by most people who have performed an heroic, life-threatening deed in order to save another human being.   In response to the inevitable question by a TV report asking “What did you feel when you were doing that?” the answer is usually “I really felt nothing.”

For example, a stranger who helped pull three children from a burning car answered the question about how he felt with the words:   “I didn’t even think about it.  It was happening so fast, and I knew I just had to get them out of there.”   Another example is the mother who lifted a tree that had pinned her son’s leg:   “I didn’t even feel how heavy it was—-until I put it down.”

You see, when love, care, and compassion for another take over completely, it is expressed in actions, not feelings.   Love is action!  Genuine love always leaps before it looks!    

That is exactly the love we celebrate on Mother’s Day this coming weekend—love in action.   Love is the force behind all the meals Mom prepares and prepared for us;  love is behind the chauffered trips to soccer, baseball, ballet, piano lesson, etc.   Love is behind all of those good-night books read to sleepy children by a tired mom at the end of a long day; love is behind all the walks and talks—-and all the other things that Mom’s do today and did in the past.    Our mothers may have not told us they loved us very often, but we knew from their actions as we look back on them how much they did love and care for us and still do if we are blessed enough to still have them with us.

So—on Mother’s Day try to do something that shows how much you love and appreciate your mother.   Don’t just tell her we love her, but DO SOMETHING TO SHOW YOUR LOVE.!

Shortly before Jesus’ death he gave his disciples a new commandment  (See John 13:31-35)     He told them to “show your love”.   He said “Love one another as I have loved you.”   He said, “By your love for each other they will know you are my disciples.”   And the love Jesus recommended was action oriented.   Jesus showed people his care for them by healing, teaching, and showing them his compassion—not just talking about it!  

How do we measure up to this commandment of love—-by our actions—not our words.   

Let me give you an example from my own life.   One Christmas, not too long after our daughter Lisa was married, my wife (now deceased) and I received a frame letter from her.   It says, in part…

“THANK YOU….

for staying together.   there are so few children today who have two parents.   Through your commitment to each other in good times and bad times you have taught me that love does not give up and it does not leave.   I saw modeled in you that love is a choice, not always a feeling.

thank you for lots of hugs and love.   You taught me that showing affection is a good thing and that I should never be embarrassed to say “I love you”.   Your affection shown to one another assured me that all was well in the world…

Thank you, Mom and Dad, for patiently persevering and loving me unconditionally even when I was the most stubborn and difficult to be around.   The love, sacrifice, and commitment you have shown me has not gone unnoticed.

You have laid a foundation in my life of security, confidence and love that has enabled me to love and be loved.   I am seeing the value of this foundation in my marriage and also in my most important relationship with God….”

This framed letter is one of my most important possessions.  It shows how love for each other influences those around us, including our children.

ARE WE DOING THIS?   Not always!   As this story indicates:

The story is told about a Los Angeles police officer who pulled a driver over to the side of the freeway and asked for his license and registration.

“What’s wrong officer?” the driver asked, “I didn’t go through any red lights, and I certainly wasn’t speeding.”

“No you weren’t speeding or breaking any laws, the officer said:   “but I saw you flashing the one-fingered salute as you swerved around the lady who was driving too slow in the center lane, and I further observed your flushed and angry face as you shouted unprintable things at the driver of the Hummer who cut you off, and I saw how you pounded your steering wheel when the freeway traffic ground to a halt.”

“Is that a crime, officer?”

“No, but when I saw the “JESUS LOVES YOU AND SO DO I” bumper sticker on your car, I figured, “This car has go to be stolen!”

LOVE IS LESS WHAT YOU SAY AND FEEL THAN IT IS WHAT YOU DO!   Amen.